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iFine Dining: By Caitlin Huskins

My friend just wrote this oh-so accurate piece about modern dining experiences and I felt I just HAD to re-post. I. COULD. NOT. AGREE. MORE.

iFine Dining.

I would like you to consider the process one embarks on each time they assemble themselves for a nice meal out on the town.

  1. You greet your companions / dining associates
  2. Perform the awkward Rebecca Black fashioned which-seat-do-I-take dance,
  3. Park yourself down with an ‘aaaahhh isn’t this nice’ and mutter other related comments on the décor
  4. Place your napkin on your lap, not forgetting that recent orange-curry-white- jeans incident
  5. Pull out your phone from your handbag / pocket / jacket and delicately place it in a position where if it should vibrate / ring / light up / alert you of any changes in the atmosphere – you will be able to respond, post haste.

Don’t deny it. I do it. You do it. The fellow three tables down does it. The couple over in the corner aren’t even looking at each other – they’re checking themselves in on facebook. Example: “OMG this shnitzel is like, a-m-a-z-i-n-g….@The Pub.” And half an hour later, “Sooooo drunk, schnit was a bad choooice @The Pub.”

Eff off.

But,  your head nodding in agreement with the annoyingness that is checking in to eat schnitzel confirms and verifies my point: we need to put the iPhone DOWN. Soon every eatery’s table in town will possess be a position especially designed for the accommodation of your particular communications device. It goes fork, knife, spoon, phone. Scan the mennnuuuu, scroll through Twitteeerrrrrr, prepare witty retort to Facebook comments, respond to Words With Friends, aaaannnd finally decide what to order the fourth time poor waitress has approached you.

I’m not advocating a Logies-style Twitter / mobile ban in all restaurants or anything, my question is more along the lines of this: Why can’t we just be happy with the experience we’re having at the present time, instead of needing to tell the world what we’re doing before we’ve even done it?

So many of my ‘friends’ (I need to use the term loosely as most of my FB friends are peeps I’ve never met or people I would cross the road to avoid bumping into in real life – sad really) go on hols/go out etc and it honestly seems like the entire time they are so busy uploading their latest ‘happy-snaps’, tagging and checking in at each new ‘hot-spot’ that I begin to wonder when they are actually having said holiday/night out….?

It’s like when you go to a new bar and there is that groups of girls who sit in the corner all night taking photo of themselves having fun rather than actually having it.

Why do we feel the need to document EVERY SINGLE MOMENT of our lives? Why do we need to let the world know we are doing something before we can actually enjoy doing it?

I actually can hold my head high when it come to this subject as I think I have checked in maybe 3 times?? Most of my friends are also non-photo takers so we often don’t even have ‘before – look how hot we look’ snaps let alone the ‘after – wow look how fun and cool and drunk I am’ pics on a night out that so many peeps spread around their fb pages.

I could continue venting about this annoying and oh-so true observation by my intelligent (and fabulous) friend Cait but I wont as most of you will probably de-tag me from your lives.

🙂

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One thought on “iFine Dining: By Caitlin Huskins

  1. People are so focused on showing other people they’re having a good time that they’re missing out on the good time itself!

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